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HELP WITH cellgd Online:
Frequently Asked Questions About cellgd Online

  1. How can I get access to cellgd Online after the free trial?

    Complete access to cellgd Online is available to everyone on the Internet during the free trial period. For additional information, please see the Subscriber Services page.


  2. Why don't you have the current issue online?

    Does it seem as if our home page and current issue never change? We publish new issues on the same schedule as the print edition. If you know that a new issue of the print journal has been published but don't see that issue appearing on the site you may be experiencing a caching problem. Please read "Is the journal getting stale?" for more information.


  3. Why are some author names misspelled?

    In some cases, author names containing accents and other diacritics and special characters are displayed incorrectly in the author index and table of contents. In these cases, the accented letters usually are dropped. Because these changes affect indexing of author names, you should avoid searching author names containing special characters until this problem is corrected.


  4. Why are the figures in articles so small? I can't read them.

    The small pictures in the text of articles are called "thumbnails." They are supposed to be small enough to load quickly and large enough to get the general idea of what it is. (See the related question below.)


  5. Do I need any additional software to view expanded thumbnails?

    CG&D Online supports a two-step expansion of thumbnail images. Clicking on a thumbnail displays a larger version of a figure as well as the complete text of the figure's caption. You don't need any additional software to view this medium-size image. See Viewing Figures for more details.


  6. When I click on a medium-sized image to expand it, why do I get a HUGE picture that covers my whole screen?

    This reflects a problem in the setup of your image viewer. Please see Help with High-Resolution Image Viewing.


  7. Why do you store large images rather than scaling them to the size of a screen so we don't have to resize them when viewing them?

    We considered reducing image sizes, but we found that we were unable to maintain sufficient quality in smaller images.


  8. How can I export reference data to a citation manager?

    See the instructions in CG&D Online Features.


  9. Why don't articles print very well?

    Internet browsers are fairly capable image viewers, but not very capable image printers. However, we have available high-quality PDF versions of articles. See Help with Printing for more details.


  10. Why are the figures listed out of order?

    We display a figure directly after the paragraph in which it is first mentioned. If an author chooses to label a figure "Figure 3" but refers to it in the text before Figures 1 or 2, the figures will appear out of order.


  11. Why do you use all those tiny images in the text?

    The tiny images are the only way for us currently to represent symbols that are not available in the standard HTML ISO-Latin-1 character set.

    However, HTML standards are being developed which will allow us to represent at least some of these symbols without the use of "inline images". As reliable browsers which support those standards become available, we'll use fewer inline images for symbols and special characters.


  12. Why are these "torn piece of paper" or "question mark" icons showing up all over the article?

    This could have two causes: either you have Auto Load Images turned off, or you have encountered an image which didn't get processed.

    If you have enabled Auto Load Images and the image still doesn't display, please send us Feedback and we'll investigate the problem.


  13. Why can't I get searching to work?

    If you are having trouble, please take a look at our Help with Searching page.


HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 2008 by the American Association of Cancer Research.