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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 9, Issue 3 239-246, Copyright © 1998 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Effects of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene expression on the tumor biology of human oral carcinoma SCC-25 cells

R Liu, TD Oberley and LW Oberley
Radiation Research Laboratory, The University of Iowa, Iowa City 52242, USA.

Stable transfection of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) cDNA in human oral carcinoma SCC-25 cells was performed. Two eNOS-expressing clones were isolated, and both were shown to have increased eNOS expression as assayed by Northern and Western analyses. Furthermore, a nitrite assay indicated that nitric oxide production in eNOS-transfected cells was increased. The growth rate and plating efficiency of eNOS-transfected cells in vitro were lower than that of the wild-type parental or vector control-transfected cells as assayed by growth curves, [3H]thymidine incorporation, and standard plating efficiency assays in L-arginine-rich medium. However, when these cancer cells were inoculated into nude mice, tumor size of eNOS-transfected cells was smaller during the first 25 days but increased later as compared to tumor size of parental and vector control-transfected cells. It is not clear whether the later increase in tumor size was due to an increase in SCC-25 cancer cell proliferation, normal stromal cell proliferation, or both. These results show significant effects of overexpression of eNOS on tumor growth in vitro and in vivo.





HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1998 by the American Association of Cancer Research.