CG&D
HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation

This Article
Right arrow Full Text (PDF)
Right arrow Alert me when this article is cited
Right arrow Alert me if a correction is posted
Services
Right arrow Similar articles in this journal
Right arrow Similar articles in PubMed
Right arrow Alert me to new issues of the journal
Right arrow Download to citation manager
Right arrow
Citing Articles
Right arrow Citing Articles via HighWire
Right arrow Citing Articles via Google Scholar
Google Scholar
Right arrow Articles by Tiainen, M.
Right arrow Articles by Crescenzi, M.
Right arrow Search for Related Content
PubMed
Right arrow PubMed Citation
Right arrow Articles by Tiainen, M.
Right arrow Articles by Crescenzi, M.

Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 7, Issue 8 1039-1050, Copyright © 1996 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Terminally differentiated skeletal myotubes are not confined to G0 but can enter G1 upon growth factor stimulation

M Tiainen, D Pajalunga, F Ferrantelli, S Soddu, G Salvatori, A Sacchi and M Crescenzi
Molecular Oncogenesis Laboratory Regina Elena Cancer Center, Rome, Italy.

Terminally differentiated cells are specialized cells unable to proliferate that constitute most of the mammalian body. Despite their abundance, little information exists on the characteristics of cell cycle control in these cells and the molecular mechanisms that prevent their proliferation. They are generally believed to be irreversibly restricted to the G0 state. In this report, we define some features of a paradigmatic terminally differentiated system, the skeletal muscle, by studying its responses to various mitogenic stimuli. We show that forced expression of a number of cell cycle-regulatory genes, including erbB-2, v-ras, v-myc, B-myb, ld-1, and E2F-1, alone or in combinations, cannot induce terminally differentiated skeletal muscle cells (myotubes) to synthesize DNA. However, serum-stimulated myotubes display a typical immediate-early response, including the up-regulation of c-fos, c-jun, c-myc, and ld-1. They also elevate the expression of cyclin D1 after 4 hours of serum treatment. All these events take place in myotubes in a way that is indistinguishable from that of quiescent, undifferentiated myoblasts reactivated by serum. Moreover, pretreatment with serum shortens the time required by E1A to induce DNA synthesis, confirming that myotubes can partially traverse G1. Serum growth factors do not activate late-G1 genes in myotubes, suggesting that the block that prevents terminally differentiated cells from proliferating acts in mid-G1. Our results show that terminally differentiated cells are not confined to G0 but can partially reenter G1 in response to growth factors; they contribute to a much-needed definition of terminal differentiation. The important differences in the control of the cell cycle between terminally differentiated and senescent cells are discussed.


This article has been cited by other articles:


Home page
J Biol ChemHome page
H. N. Rajabi, C. Takahashi, and M. E. Ewen
Retinoblastoma Protein and MyoD Function Together to Effect the Repression of Fra-1 and in Turn Cyclin D1 during Terminal Cell Cycle Arrest Associated with Myogenesis
J. Biol. Chem., August 22, 2014; 289(34): 23417 - 23427.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USAHome page
L. Narciso, P. Fortini, D. Pajalunga, A. Franchitto, P. Liu, P. Degan, M. Frechet, B. Demple, M. Crescenzi, and E. Dogliotti
Terminally differentiated muscle cells are defective in base excision DNA repair and hypersensitive to oxygen injury
PNAS, October 23, 2007; 104(43): 17010 - 17015.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
JCBHome page
D. Pajalunga, A. Mazzola, A. M. Salzano, M. G. Biferi, G. De Luca, and M. Crescenzi
Critical requirement for cell cycle inhibitors in sustaining nonproliferative states
J. Cell Biol., March 12, 2007; 176(6): 807 - 818.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
JCBHome page
G. Camarda, F. Siepi, D. Pajalunga, C. Bernardini, R. Rossi, A. Montecucco, E. Meccia, and M. Crescenzi
A pRb-independent mechanism preserves the postmitotic state in terminally differentiated skeletal muscle cells
J. Cell Biol., November 8, 2004; 167(3): 417 - 423.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
JCBHome page
M. S. Huh, M. H. Parker, A. Scime, R. Parks, and M. A. Rudnicki
Rb is required for progression through myogenic differentiation but not maintenance of terminal differentiation
J. Cell Biol., September 13, 2004; 166(6): 865 - 876.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Mol. Biol. CellHome page
A. Gurtner, I. Manni, P. Fuschi, R. Mantovani, F. Guadagni, A. Sacchi, and G. Piaggio
Requirement for Down-Regulation of the CCAAT-binding Activity of the NF-Y Transcription Factor during Skeletal Muscle Differentiation
Mol. Biol. Cell, July 1, 2003; 14(7): 2706 - 2715.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
JCBHome page
I. M. Bonapace, L. Latella, R. Papait, F. Nicassio, A. Sacco, M. Muto, M. Crescenzi, and P. P. Di Fiore
Np95 is regulated by E1A during mitotic reactivation of terminally differentiated cells and is essential for S phase entry
J. Cell Biol., June 10, 2002; 157(6): 909 - 914.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Mol. Cell. Biol.Home page
L. Latella, A. Sacco, D. Pajalunga, M. Tiainen, D. Macera, M. D'Angelo, A. Felici, A. Sacchi, and M. Crescenzi
Reconstitution of Cyclin D1-Associated Kinase Activity Drives Terminally Differentiated Cells into the Cell Cycle
Mol. Cell. Biol., August 15, 2001; 21(16): 5631 - 5643.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
JCBHome page
A. Mal, D. Chattopadhyay, M. K. Ghosh, R. Y.C. Poon, T. Hunter, and M. L. Harter
P21 and Retinoblastoma Protein Control the Absence of DNA Replication in Terminally Differentiated Muscle Cells
J. Cell Biol., April 17, 2000; 149(2): 281 - 292.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.Home page
J.-M. Li, R. A. Poolman, and G. Brooks
Role of G1 phase cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases during cardiomyocyte hypertrophic growth in rats
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, September 1, 1998; 275(3): H814 - H822.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]




HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1996 by the American Association of Cancer Research.