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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 7, Issue 12 1761-1767, Copyright © 1996 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Involvement of gicerin, a cell adhesion molecule, in tracheal development and regeneration

Y Tsukamoto, E Taira, T Kotani, J Yamate, S Wada, N Takaha, N Miki and S Sakuma
Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Agriculture, Osaka Prefecture University, Japan.

Gicerin is a novel cell adhesion protein that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Gicerin protein adheres to neurite outgrowth factor, an extracellular matrix protein in the laminin family, and also exhibits homophilic adhesion. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of gicerin and neurite outgrowth factor in tracheal development and regeneration. In an early embryonic stage, gicerin protein was highly expressed in tracheal epithelial cells, but not in loosely arranged mesenchymal cells. During development, mesenchymal cells become condensed around the tracheal epithelium and then differentiate into muscle and cartilage; high levels of gicerin expression were observed in these cells. In the later embryonic and posthatching stages, no gicerin expression was detected in tracheal epithelium or cartilage. In addition, expression of gicerin increased transiently in the tracheal epithelium during the regeneration after tracheitis induced by the infectious bronchitis virus. Furthermore, a polyclonal antibody against gicerin inhibited the epithelial regeneration in tracheal organ cultures. These findings suggest that glcerin plays an important role in both tracheal development and regeneration.





HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1996 by the American Association of Cancer Research.