CG&D
HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation

This Article
Right arrow Full Text (PDF)
Right arrow Alert me when this article is cited
Right arrow Alert me if a correction is posted
Services
Right arrow Similar articles in this journal
Right arrow Similar articles in PubMed
Right arrow Alert me to new issues of the journal
Right arrow Download to citation manager
Right arrow
Citing Articles
Right arrow Citing Articles via HighWire
Right arrow Citing Articles via Google Scholar
Google Scholar
Right arrow Articles by Peterson, G.
Right arrow Articles by Barnes, S.
Right arrow Search for Related Content
PubMed
Right arrow PubMed Citation
Right arrow Articles by Peterson, G.
Right arrow Articles by Barnes, S.

Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 7, Issue 10 1345-1351, Copyright © 1996 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Genistein inhibits both estrogen and growth factor-stimulated proliferation of human breast cancer cells

G Peterson and S Barnes
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at Birmingham 35294, USA.

Genistein is a naturally occurring dietary protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor that is hypothesized to be responsible for the lower rate of breast cancer observed in Asian women consuming soy. Although genistein is a potent in vitro PTK inhibitor, its mechanism of action in vivo is not known. In vivo, breast cancer growth is regulated by estrogens and peptide growth factors, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), the receptor of which has intrinsic PTK activity. Therefore, genistein may block mammary epithelial cell growth by interfering with signal transduction events stimulated by estradiol or growth factors. The effect of genistein, related isoflavones, and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors on fetal bovine serum-, estradiol-, and EGF-stimulated cell growth and signal transduction pathways was examined in five human breast cancer cell lines. Genistein inhibited the growth of these cells by each of the growth stimuli with IC50 values ranging from 2.6 to over 20 micrograms/ml. Growth inhibition by genistein was cytostatic and reversible at IC50 concentrations. Related isoflavones were less potent growth inhibitors than genistein, whereas the synthetic PTK inhibitor tyrphostin A25 was an equally potent growth inhibitor. The mechanism of genistein growth inhibition in human breast cancer cells did not depend on the presence of functional estrogen receptor signaling pathways or on inhibition of EGF-receptor PTK activity. Furthermore, genistein (< or = 20 micrograms/ml) did not decrease constitutive or EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation as determined by Western blotting with antiphosphotyrosine antibodies. These data suggest that although genistein inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells in culture, it does so without gross inhibition of PTK activity.


This article has been cited by other articles:


Home page
Cancer Prev ResHome page
I. E. Obiorah, P. Fan, and V. C. Jordan
Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis with Phytoestrogens Is Dependent on an Estrogen-Deprived State
Cancer Prevention Research, September 1, 2014; 7(9): 939 - 949.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
DiabetesHome page
D. Liu, W. Zhen, Z. Yang, J. D. Carter, H. Si, and K. A. Reynolds
Genistein Acutely Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic {beta}-Cells Through a cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Pathway.
Diabetes, April 1, 2006; 55(4): 1043 - 1050.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
J. Nutr.Home page
H. A. Norman, R. R. Butrum, E. Feldman, D. Heber, D. Nixon, M. F. Picciano, R. Rivlin, A. Simopoulos, M. J. Wargovich, E. K. Weisburger, et al.
The Role of Dietary Supplements during Cancer Therapy
J. Nutr., November 1, 2003; 133(11): 3794S - 3799.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
J. Nutr.Home page
M. J. Messina and C. L. Loprinzi
Soy for Breast Cancer Survivors: A Critical Review of the Literature
J. Nutr., November 1, 2001; 131(11): 3095S - 3108.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.Home page
X. O. Shu, F. Jin, Q. Dai, W. Wen, J. D. Potter, L. H. Kushi, Z. Ruan, Y.-T. Gao, and W. Zheng
Soyfood Intake during Adolescence and Subsequent Risk of Breast Cancer among Chinese Women
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev., May 1, 2001; 10(5): 483 - 488.
[Abstract] [Full Text]


Home page
Cancer Res.Home page
S. Tamir, M. Eizenberg, D. Somjen, N. Stern, R. Shelach, A. Kaye, and J. Vaya
Estrogenic and Antiproliferative Properties of Glabridin from Licorice in Human Breast Cancer Cells
Cancer Res., October 1, 2000; 60(20): 5704 - 5709.
[Abstract] [Full Text]


Home page
Pharmacol. Rev.Home page
R. E. Favoni and A. de Cupis
The Role of Polypeptide Growth Factors in Human Carcinomas: New Targets for a Novel Pharmacological Approach
Pharmacol. Rev., June 1, 2000; 52(2): 179 - 206.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
JACCHome page
L. Wroblewski Lissin and J. P. Cooke
Phytoestrogens and cardiovascular health
JACC, May 1, 2000; 35(6): 1403 - 1410.
[PDF]


Home page
J. Nutr.Home page
S. Barnes, H. Kim, V. Darley-Usmar, R. Patel, J. Xu, B. Boersma, and M. Luo
Beyond ER{alpha} and ER{beta}: Estrogen Receptor Binding Is Only Part of the Isoflavone Story
J. Nutr., March 1, 2000; 130(3): 656 - 656.
[Full Text]


Home page
Am J Clin NutrHome page
M. J Messina
Legumes and soybeans: overview of their nutritional profiles and health effects
Am J Clin Nutr, September 1, 1999; 70(3): 439S - 450.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Cancer Res.Home page
D. S. Hunter, L. C. Hodges, P. M. Vonier, R. Fuchs-Young, M. M. Gottardis, and C. L. Walker
Estrogen Receptor Activation via Activation Function 2 Predicts Agonism of Xenoestrogens in Normal and Neoplastic Cells of the Uterine Myometrium
Cancer Res., July 1, 1999; 59(13): 3090 - 3099.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
J. Nutr.Home page
S. Ji, G. M. Willis, G. R. Frank, S. G. Cornelius, and M. E. Spurlock
Soybean Isoflavones, Genistein and Genistin, Inhibit Rat Myoblast Proliferation, Fusion and Myotube Protein Synthesis
J. Nutr., July 1, 1999; 129(7): 1291 - 1297.
[Abstract] [Full Text]


Home page
J. Nutr.Home page
J. Sfakianos, L. Coward, M. Kirk, and S. Barnes
Intestinal Uptake and Biliary Excretion of the Isoflavone Genistein in Rats
J. Nutr., July 1, 1997; 127(7): 1260 - 1268.
[Abstract] [Full Text]




HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1996 by the American Association of Cancer Research.