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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 6, Issue 3 281-290, Copyright © 1995 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Epithelial rat thyroid cell clones, escaping from transforming growth factor beta negative growth control, are still inhibited by this factor in the ability to trap iodide

A Coppa, G Mincione, S Mammarella, A Ranieri and G Colletta
Department of Experimental Medicine, University of La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.

Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) acts on epithelial thyroid cells, negatively controlling their proliferation and functions. The effects of TGF beta on epithelial rat thyroid cells (FRTL-5) and on two TGF beta-resistant rat thyroid cell clones (FRTL-5H2 and FRTL-R) were investigated. FRTL-5H2 represents a rat thyroid cell clone overexpressing active erbB-2 oncogene, recently obtained after FRTL-5 cell infection with a retrovirus vector carrying the erbB-2 human oncogene (G. Mincione et al., Cancer Res., 53: 5548-5553, 1993). FRTL-R is a FRTL-5 subclone spontaneously isolated after long term in culture. FRTL-5H2 and FRTL-R cell clones were stimulated by TGF beta at the same concentration of 5 ng/ml that induced 70% inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation in control FRTL-5 thyroid cells. Nuclear events regulated by TGF beta, such as cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase gene expression, were then analyzed. In FRTL-5 cells, TGF beta was found to reduce the expression of cdk2 and cyclin A genes; the same treatment did not modify nuclear gene expression in the resistant cell clones. TGF beta is known to reduce iodide uptake in thyroid cells; in both FRTL-5H2 and FRTL-R cells, TGF beta was found to inhibit the thyrotropin-induced iodide uptake. Thus, thyroid cell clones, resistant to the growth-inhibitory activity of TGF beta, were sensitive to TGF beta inhibition of iodide incorporation, suggesting that TGF beta activates divergent signaling pathways in these cells, separately controlling cell proliferation and differentiation parameters. Studies on TGF beta receptors showed similar amounts of TGF beta-binding species on FRTL-5 cells and TGF beta-resistant clones, while 125I-labeled TGF beta cross-linking experiments revealed differences; thus, the TGF beta-resistant cells showed a 40% decrease in the amount of labeled type II TGF beta receptor on the cell surface. However, this different pattern of TGF beta receptors cannot totally account for the shown TGF beta resistance to growth inhibition that might also be due to perturbation in signaling pathways.


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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1995 by the American Association of Cancer Research.