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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 5, Issue 8 881-890, Copyright © 1994 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Protein kinase C isozyme expression and down-modulation in growing, quiescent, and transformed renal proximal tubule epithelial cells

L Dong, JL Stevens, D Fabbro and S Jaken
W. Alton Jones Cell Science Center, Inc., Lake Placid, New York 12946-1099.

Renal alpha-protein kinase C (PKC) is rapidly down-modulated modulated in animals treated with the renal toxin and tumor promoter, folic acid (Dong et al., Cancer Res., 53: 4542-4549, 1993). To further explore the role of PKC isozymes in renal growth and carcinogenesis, we compared phorbol ester receptor and PKC isozyme content, distribution, and regulation in primary and oncogene-altered rat renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTE) in culture. Immunoblot analysis and RNase protection assays indicated that RPTE expressed at least four PKC isozymes, alpha, delta, epsilon, and zeta. Total phorbol ester receptors were decreased in primary proliferating, E1A-immortalized, and SV40-transformed RPTE compared to primary quiescent RPTE. The decrease in PDBu binding was largely due to a specific decrease in alpha-PKC protein content to approximately 50% of the level in quiescent RPTE. Degradation rates and message levels were compared to determine the mechanism for the decrease in alpha-PKC. Whereas alpha-PKC message levels in quiescent and proliferating primary RPTE were comparable, alpha-PKC degradation was increased in proliferating cells. These results indicate that the decreased alpha-PKC content was due largely to increased turnover. Phorbol ester stimulated the rate of degradation, thus demonstrating a link between degradation rate and PKC activation. These results suggest that the increased basal degradation rate in proliferating and oncogene-altered cells reflects an increase in activity of PKC in these cells.


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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1994 by the American Association of Cancer Research.