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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 5, Issue 8 855-861, Copyright © 1994 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

An endogenous signal triggering erythroid differentiation: identification as thyroid hormone

RD Dinnen, SR White, S Elsayed, YI Yeh and K Ebisuzaki
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.

The identification of thyroid hormone as an endogenous signal for erythroid differentiation began with our studies on the spontaneously differentiating murine erythroleukemia clone 3-1. We observed that the spontaneous differentiation frequency was dependent on a heat stable factor present in fetal calf serum or calf bone marrow. We also noted that the bone marrow extract stimulated erythroid colony-forming units in mouse bone marrow cells, suggesting the relevance of this factor in normal erythroid differentiation. The bone marrow extract did not supplant the requirement of erythropoietin but was synergistic. Purification of the bone marrow extract indicated that the differentiation-inducing activity for clone 3-1 cells cochromatographed with a low-molecular-weight, UV (280 nm)-absorbing component(s). These observations and previous reports identifying the avian erythroblastosis virus oncogene v-erbA as a mutated thyroid hormone receptor which blocked erythroid differentiation led us to test thyroid hormone in our assay. Both triiodothyronine and thyroxine were highly active, and the active constituents in the chromatographically purified fraction were identified as triiodothyronine and thyroxine. Although thyroid hormone action has been associated with both in vivo and in vitro erythroid differentiation, its role has been often relegated to a secondary status. We suggest that thyroid hormone is required for the commitment of erythroid cells to terminal differentiation.





HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1994 by the American Association of Cancer Research.