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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 5, Issue 6 637-646, Copyright © 1994 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Dysfunction of the Myc-induced apoptosis mechanism accompanies c-myc activation in the tumorigenic L929 cell line

LM Facchini, S Chen and LJ Penn
Department of Microbiology, Hospital for Sick Children and Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Activation of the c-myc protooncogene, resulting in deregulated, over-expression of the c-Myc protein, can induce both cell proliferation and programmed cell death (apoptosis) in nontransformed cells. Yet, c-myc activation is commonly tolerated in many tumors. This apparent paradox can be resolved if activation of c-myc in transformed cells is associated with loss of Myc-induced apoptosis. To examine this hypothesis, we characterized both the mechanisms of c-myc activation and programmed cell death in the tumorigenic L929 cell line. We showed that activation of c-myc in the L929 cell line involves several distinct mechanisms, including dysfunction of the Myc autosuppression pathway and alteration of c-Myc protein expression. In addition, we demonstrated that L929 cells do not undergo Myc-induced apoptosis. Analysis of somatic cell hybrids revealed that this abrogation of programmed cell death can be partially restored and is likely due to one or more genetic lesions. Our results support the hypothesis that the dysfunction of the Myc-induced apoptosis mechanism can accompany c-myc activation and provide an in vivo example illustrating two cooperative events which can contribute to tumor progression.


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S. K. Oster, W. W. Marhin, C. Asker, L. M. Facchini, P. A. Dion, K. Funa, M. Post, J. M. Sedivy, and L. Z. Penn
Myc Is an Essential Negative Regulator of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Beta Receptor Expression
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[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


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L. Facchini and L. Z. Penn
The molecular role of Myc in growth and transformation: recent discoveries lead to new insights
FASEB J, June 1, 1998; 12(9): 633 - 651.
[Abstract] [Full Text]


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JCBHome page
R. A. Screaton, L. Z. Penn, and C. P. Stanners
Carcinoembryonic Antigen, a Human Tumor Marker, Cooperates with Myc and Bcl-2 in Cellular Transformation
J. Cell Biol., May 19, 1997; 137(4): 939 - 952.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]




HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1994 by the American Association of Cancer Research.