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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 5, Issue 5 549-555, Copyright © 1994 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 catalytic domain can transduce a proliferative signal in FDC-P1 cells that is qualitatively similar to the signal delivered by c-Fms

MT Rossner, GA McArthur, JD Allen and D Metcalf
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

A full length clone of murine fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 [flt3, also known as fetal liver kinase 2 (flk2)] was constructed from sequences obtained from a brain complementary DNA (cDNA) library and from cDNA prepared from the cell line Tikaut. In the absence of a ligand to study the function of Flt3, a chimeric molecule was constructed comprising the extracellular domain of murine c-Fms and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of Flt3. A plasmid encoding the chimeric receptor was cotransfected along with a plasmid conferring neomycin resistance into FDC-P1 cells that do not normally express c-fms or flt3 and require granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin 3 for growth. Two types of clones were obtained following selection in GM-CSF and G418. Two of seven clones had the capacity for M-CSF-dependent colony formation in semisolid medium, indicating that the cytoplasmic domain of Flt3 can transduce a proliferative signal. From the remaining clones, M-CSF-dependent clonogenic cells could be selected by prior bulk liquid culture in M-CSF. It has been shown previously that the GM-CSF-dependent proliferative capacity is strongly inhibited by M-CSF in FDC-P1 cells engineered to express full length c-fms. This phenomenon was also observed with FD/fms-flt3 cells that were clonogenic in M-CSF. Stimulation of FD/fms or FD/fms-flt3 cells in liquid culture by M-CSF caused differentiation of a small proportion of cells along the myelomonocytic pathway which was enhanced by the combination of M-CSF and GM-CSF.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)


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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1994 by the American Association of Cancer Research.