CG&D
HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation

This Article
Right arrow Full Text (PDF)
Right arrow Alert me when this article is cited
Right arrow Alert me if a correction is posted
Services
Right arrow Similar articles in this journal
Right arrow Similar articles in PubMed
Right arrow Alert me to new issues of the journal
Right arrow Download to citation manager
Right arrow
Citing Articles
Right arrow Citing Articles via HighWire
Right arrow Citing Articles via Google Scholar
Google Scholar
Right arrow Articles by Douglas, J. L.
Right arrow Articles by Quinlan, M. P.
Right arrow Search for Related Content
PubMed
Right arrow PubMed Citation
Right arrow Articles by Douglas, J. L.
Right arrow Articles by Quinlan, M. P.

Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 5, Issue 5 475-483, Copyright © 1994 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Efficient nuclear localization of the Ad5 E1A 12S protein is necessary for immortalization but not cotransformation of primary epithelial cells

JL Douglas and MP Quinlan
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis 38163.

The Ad5 E1A 12S gene encodes a nuclear protein that can immortalize and cooperate with other oncoproteins to transform primary epithelial cells. Expression of the first exon is necessary for the activation of cellular proliferation, immortalization, and transformation. The second exon is necessary for the maintenance of cellular proliferation, immortalization, and the induction of an epithelial cell growth factor but is dispensable for cotransformation with T24 ras. Expression of the second exon is also necessary for efficient nuclear localization of the 12S polypeptide. A five-amino acid nuclear localization signal (NLS), Lys-Arg-Pro-Arg-Pro is encoded by the last 15 nucleotides of the second exon. To determine the role of subcellular localization in immortalization and transformation, a mutational analysis of the second exon and the 12S NLS was undertaken. The results from our analysis indicate that regions of the second exon outside the NLS affect nuclear localization. These regions necessary for efficient nuclear localization of the 12S protein are coincident with regions necessary for immortalization. In contrast, these regions are dispensable for cotransformation with T24 ras. The importance of the positively charged amino acids of the NLS in signal function and immortalization is varied. Lys 239 is the most critical residue, followed by Arg 240 and Arg 242, respectively. These data indicate that efficient nuclear localization of 12S is necessary for immortalization but not cotransformation with T24 ras.


This article has been cited by other articles:


Home page
J. Virol.Home page
M. J. Cohen, A. F. Yousef, P. Massimi, G. J. Fonseca, B. Todorovic, P. Pelka, A. S. Turnell, L. Banks, and J. S. Mymryk
Dissection of the C-Terminal Region of E1A Redefines the Roles of CtBP and Other Cellular Targets in Oncogenic Transformation
J. Virol., September 15, 2013; 87(18): 10348 - 10355.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
J Biol ChemHome page
D. L. Madison, P. Yaciuk, R. P. S. Kwok, and J. R. Lundblad
Acetylation of the Adenovirus-transforming Protein E1A Determines Nuclear Localization by Disrupting Association with Importin-{alpha}
J. Biol. Chem., October 11, 2002; 277(41): 38755 - 38763.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
J. Virol.Home page
R. S. Fischer and M. P. Quinlan
Expression of the pRb-Binding Regions of E1A Enables Efficient Transformation of Primary Epithelial Cells by v-src
J. Virol., April 1, 1998; 72(4): 2815 - 2824.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]




HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1994 by the American Association of Cancer Research.