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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 5, Issue 10 1093-1103, Copyright © 1994 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Similarities between somatic cells overexpressing the mos oncogene and oocytes during meiotic interphase

K Fukasawa, MS Murakami, DG Blair, R Kuriyama, T Hunt, P Fischinger and GF Vande Woude
ABL-Basic Research Program, NCI-Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Maryland 21702-1201.

The mos protooncogene encodes a serine/threonine kinase and is a key regulator of oocyte meiotic maturation. After acute infection of Swiss 3T3 cells with virus containing the v-mos oncogene, cells expressing high levels of v-Mos round up and detach from the monolayer (floating cells), while cells that remain attached express 10-fold lower levels of v-Mos and are transformed. The floating cells are growth arrested with their chromosomes partially condensed in the absence of histone H1 kinase activity, while mitogen-activated protein kinase activity is very high. Collectively, these properties are similar to properties observed in maturing oocytes between meiosis I and II. In v-mos-transformed cell populations, mitogen-activated protein kinase activity is also elevated, correlating with the degree of morphological transformation and the level of Mos expression. Moreover, phosphoprotein modifications specific for M are found in both the floating cells and in v-mos-transformed cells, regardless of their cell cycle stage. One explanation for both morphological transformation and the phenotypes of the floating cells is that Mos imposes a meiotic program on different stages of the somatic cell cycle. The extent of this meiotic phenotype is proportional to the level of v-Mos expression. These results suggest that both morphological transformation and the phenotypes of the floating cells induced by Mos in Swiss 3T3 cells are related to its normal activities during oocyte maturation.


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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1994 by the American Association of Cancer Research.