CG&D
HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation

This Article
Right arrow Full Text (PDF)
Right arrow Alert me when this article is cited
Right arrow Alert me if a correction is posted
Services
Right arrow Similar articles in this journal
Right arrow Similar articles in PubMed
Right arrow Alert me to new issues of the journal
Right arrow Download to citation manager
Right arrow
Citing Articles
Right arrow Citing Articles via HighWire
Right arrow Citing Articles via Google Scholar
Google Scholar
Right arrow Articles by Brott, B. K.
Right arrow Articles by Erikson, R. L.
Right arrow Search for Related Content
PubMed
Right arrow PubMed Citation
Right arrow Articles by Brott, B. K.
Right arrow Articles by Erikson, R. L.

Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 4, Issue 11 921-929, Copyright © 1993 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

MEK2 is a kinase related to MEK1 and is differentially expressed in murine tissues

BK Brott, A Alessandrini, DA Largaespada, NG Copeland, NA Jenkins, CM Crews and RL Erikson
Department of Cellular and Developmental Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138.

MEK1 is a dual specificity kinase that phosphorylates and activates the Erk/MAP kinases Erk-1 and Erk-2 by phosphorylating them on threonine and tyrosine. We report the cloning of a second MEK-like complementary DNA, Mek2, which predicts a protein of a molecular weight of 44,500. The MEK2 protein bears substantial sequence homology to MEK1, except at its amino terminus, and at a proline-rich region insert between the conserved kinase subdomains 9 and 10. MEK1 and MEK2 are shown to be encoded by different genes and are located on murine chromosomes 9 and 10, respectively. Northern analysis indicates that Mek2 is expressed at low levels in adult mouse brain and heart tissue, and at higher levels in other tissues examined. Low expression levels of Mek2 in brain tissue are in contrast to the high levels of Mek1 expressed in brain. Mek2 is expressed at high levels in neonatal brain, however. Recombinant MEK2 produced in bacteria phosphorylates a kinase-inactive Erk-1 on tyrosine and threonine, whereas a kinase-inactive mutant MEK2 does not. These findings suggest that MEK2 is a member of a multigene family.


This article has been cited by other articles:


Home page
J. Virol.Home page
J. Wang, S. Chen, Y. Liao, E. Zhang, S. Feng, S. Yu, L.-F. Li, W.-R. He, Y. Li, Y. Luo, et al.
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 2, a Novel E2-Interacting Protein, Promotes the Growth of Classical Swine Fever Virus via Attenuation of the JAK-STAT Signaling Pathway
J. Virol., November 15, 2016; 90(22): 10271 - 10283.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.Home page
V. E. Vargas, K. M. Kaushal, T. R. Monau, D. A. Myers, and C. A. Ducsay
Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) signaling pathway plays a role in cortisol secretion in the long-term hypoxic ovine fetal adrenal near term
Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol, April 15, 2013; 304(8): R636 - R643.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Biochem. J.Home page
P.-Y. Wang, J. N. Rao, T. Zou, L. Liu, L. Xiao, T.-X. Yu, D. J. Turner, M. Gorospe, and J.-Y. Wang
Post-transcriptional regulation of MEK-1 by polyamines through the RNA-binding protein HuR modulating intestinal epithelial apoptosis
Biochem. J., March 15, 2010; 426(3): 293 - 306.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
DevelopmentHome page
V. Nadeau, S. Guillemette, L.-F. Belanger, O. Jacob, S. Roy, and J. Charron
Map2k1 and Map2k2 genes contribute to the normal development of syncytiotrophoblasts during placentation
Development, April 15, 2009; 136(8): 1363 - 1374.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
DevelopmentHome page
V. Bissonauth, S. Roy, M. Gravel, S. Guillemette, and J. Charron
Requirement for Map2k1 (Mek1) in extra-embryonic ectoderm during placentogenesis
Development, September 1, 2006; 133(17): 3429 - 3440.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
J Biol ChemHome page
J. Wang, H. Feng, X.-Q. Huang, H. Xiang, Y.-W. Mao, J.-P. Liu, Q. Yan, W.-B. Liu, Y. Liu, M. Deng, et al.
Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Immortalizes Bovine Lens Epithelial Cells and Suppresses Differentiation through Regulation of the ERK Signaling Pathway
J. Biol. Chem., June 17, 2005; 280(24): 22776 - 22787.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Mol. Cell. Biol.Home page
L.-F. Belanger, S. Roy, M. Tremblay, B. Brott, A.-M. Steff, W. Mourad, P. Hugo, R. Erikson, and J. Charron
Mek2 Is Dispensable for Mouse Growth and Development
Mol. Cell. Biol., July 15, 2003; 23(14): 4778 - 4787.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
J Biol ChemHome page
M. K. Abe, K. T. Kahle, M. P. Saelzler, K. Orth, J. E. Dixon, and M. R. Rosner
ERK7 Is an Autoactivated Member of the MAPK Family
J. Biol. Chem., June 15, 2001; 276(24): 21272 - 21279.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
J. Neurosci.Home page
N. Klocker, P. Kermer, J. H. Weishaupt, M. Labes, R. Ankerhold, and M. Bahr
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Mediated Neuroprotection of Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells In Vivo Does Not Exclusively Depend on Phosphatidyl-Inositol-3'-Kinase/Protein Kinase B Signaling
J. Neurosci., September 15, 2000; 20(18): 6962 - 6967.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Physiol. Rev.Home page
C. WIDMANN, S. GIBSON, M. B. JARPE, and G. L. JOHNSON
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase: Conservation of a Three-Kinase Module From Yeast to Human
Physiol Rev, January 1, 1999; 79(1): 143 - 180.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
J Biol ChemHome page
H. Greulich and R. L. Erikson
An Analysis of Mek1 Signaling in Cell Proliferation and Transformation
J. Biol. Chem., May 22, 1998; 273(21): 13280 - 13288.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
EMBO J.Home page
H. Ma, M. Gamper, C. Parent, and R. A. Firtel
The Dictyostelium MAP kinase kinase DdMEK1 regulates chemotaxis and is essential for chemoattractant-mediated activation of guanylyl cyclase
EMBO J., July 15, 1997; 16(14): 4317 - 4332.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
J Biol ChemHome page
M. K. Abe, K. T. Kahle, M. P. Saelzler, K. Orth, J. E. Dixon, and M. R. Rosner
ERK7 Is an Autoactivated Member of the MAPK Family
J. Biol. Chem., June 15, 2001; 276(24): 21272 - 21279.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]




HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1993 by the American Association of Cancer Research.