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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 4, Issue 10 849-859, Copyright © 1993 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Expression of the nontransmembrane tyrosine phosphatase gene erp during mouse organogenesis

D Carrasco and R Bravo
Department of Molecular Biology, Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-4000.

We have studied the expression of the nontransmembrane tyrosine phosphatase gene erp during mouse development using in situ hybridization analysis. The results show that during the early postimplantational stages of development, erp expression is observed only in maternally derived decidual cells surrounding the developing embryo. At day 10.5, erp is weakly expressed in the embryo in the neural tube, hind gut, and other embryonic structures. However, in 12.5-day embryos, erp is present in most organs, with the highest expression restricted to the developing neural system. During later development, at day 17.5, the levels of erp decline in some neural structures but remain high in others, like the dorsal root ganglia. High levels of erp expression are maintained in several parts of adult brain, such as cortical layers, thalamus, hypothalamus, and hippocampus. High levels of erp transcripts are also observed in the cerebellar cortex, in the Purkinje cell layer, and in the granular cell layer. In all tissues analyzed, the expression of erp corresponds to regions undergoing terminal cell differentiation and/or regions where cell proliferation has declined.


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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1993 by the American Association of Cancer Research.