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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 3, Issue 9 609-616, Copyright © 1992 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Persistent expression of the tumor suppressor gene DCC is essential for neuronal differentiation

KG Lawlor and R Narayanan
Department of Molecular Genetics, Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc., Nutley, New Jersey 07110.

Cell differentiation is associated either with a complete loss of proliferative potential or with a change in growth requirements. Neoplastic transformation may result from the activation of oncogenes that support growth or from inactivation or loss of tumor suppressor genes, which are thought to regulate differentiation. To examine the relationship between tumor suppressor genes and cell differentiation, we chose the gene "deleted in colorectal cancer" (DCC) and studied its role in a pheochromocytoma cell line, PC-12, using antisense RNA as well as antisense oligonucleotides to DCC. When exposed to nerve growth factor for several days, PC-12 cells develop long dendrites. This morphological change follows the transient expression of immediate early genes and is associated with an up-regulation of DCC. Interestingly, if the up-regulation of DCC was counteracted using an antisense RNA technique, the morphological changes were prevented, but the other parameters of the nerve growth factor response were unaffected. Moreover, when DCC expression was inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides to DCC in nerve growth factor-differentiated cells, the neuron-like phenotype was reversed. Our results demonstrate that the gene DCC is involved in a distal segment of neural differentiation and provide the first direct evidence that a tumor suppressor gene plays a role in cell differentiation.


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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1992 by the American Association of Cancer Research.