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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 3, Issue 5 269-278, Copyright © 1992 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Overexpression of three ubiquitin genes in mouse epidermal tumors is associated with enhanced cellular proliferation and stress [published erratum appears in Cell Growth Differ 1992 Aug;3(8):566]

JS Finch, T St. John, P Krieg, K Bonham, HT Smith, VA Fried and GT Bowden
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arizona Medical School, Tucson 85724.

A mouse ubiquitin clone that recognizes multiple transcripts overexpressed in murine tumors compared to normal epidermis was isolated by differential screening of complementary DNA libraries from mouse squamous cell carcinomas. Coding region probes detected five ubiquitin transcripts. Oligonucleotides were designed for unique parts of three mouse ubiquitin gene complementary DNA clones. The overexpressed transcripts at 2.4, 2.8, 6.4, and 7.8 kilobases (kb) were detected by an oligonucleotide specific for a mouse UbC polyubiquitin clone. A 1.2-kb UbB overexpressed transcript was detected by an oligonucleotide for a mouse four-unit polyubiquitin, and a 0.7-kb UbA overexpressed transcript was recognized by an oligonucleotide for the mouse ubiquitin carboxyl-extension protein of 52 amino acids. All three classes of transcripts were induced in mouse skin by the hyperproliferative agent ethylphenyl propionate and by the tumor promoting agent 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13- acetate. Heat shock of cultured keratinocytes induced both the 6.4- and 7.8-kb transcripts recognized by the UbC-specific oligonucleotide. Consistent with the overexpression of the ubiquitin transcripts, the level of free ubiquitin protein, as determined by Western analysis, was elevated in the tumors and proliferating epidermis as compared to normal epidermis. Our results indicate that the overexpression of ubiquitin genes could be related to a sustained state of proliferation and stress in the tumors compared to the normal resting epidermis.


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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1992 by the American Association of Cancer Research.