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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 3, Issue 11 847-853, Copyright © 1992 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Differential effects of phorbol esters on proliferation and calcyclin expression in human endometrial carcinoma cells

Y Gong, B Alkhalaf, LJ Murphy and LC Murphy
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.

Calcyclin is a member of the S-100 family of calcium-binding proteins, whose expression is enhanced when quiescent cells are exposed to mitogenic signals. The function of calcyclin is unknown, but it is thought to be involved in modulating the intracellular calcium concentration following mitogenic stimuli. Since activation of protein kinase C (PKC) also occurs following stimulation of quiescent cells by a variety of mitogens, we have investigated the relationship between calcyclin expression and PKC activation in three human endometrial adenocarcinoma cell lines. The addition of 10(-7) M 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to HEC-50 and HEC-1B cell cultures resulted in a change in cell morphology, an inhibition of proliferation, an increase in calcyclin transcription rate, and an increase in calcyclin mRNA and calcyclin protein levels. In contrast, PMA had no effect on cell morphology or cell proliferation in the Ishikawa adenocarcinoma cell line but enhanced calcyclin expression. Another bioactive phorbol ester had the same effect, whereas the calcium ionophore A23187 and the non-phorbol-ester-type tumor promoter thapsigargin had no effect on calcyclin expression. The effect of PMA on calcyclin expression was blocked by the simultaneous addition of the PKC inhibitor staurosporine and by protein synthesis inhibition with cycloheximide. RNase protection assays and primer extension analysis demonstrated that PMA enhanced transcription from all three of the previously identified transcription start sites in the calcyclin gene. These data clearly demonstrate a dissociation between calcyclin expression and cellular proliferation and suggest that the enhanced calcyclin expression which is seen in quiescent cells following mitogenic stimuli may result from activation of the PKC system.


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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1992 by the American Association of Cancer Research.