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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 2, Issue 2 115-127, Copyright © 1991 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Simian virus 40 large T antigen and p53 are microtubule-associated proteins in transformed cells

SA Maxwell, SK Ames, ET Sawai, GL Decker, RG Cook and JS Butel
Division of Molecular Virology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030.

The cellular proteins that interact with simian virus 40 large T antigen (T-ag) must be identified in order to understand T-ag effects on cellular growth control mechanisms. A protein extraction procedure utilizing single-phase concentrations of 1-butanol recovered a complex composed of T-ag, p53, and other Mr 35,000-60,000 proteins from suspension cultures of the simian virus 40-transformed mouse cell line mKSA. Partial protease mapping showed each of the associated proteins to be unique. Automated microsequence analysis of the NH2-terminal 30 amino acids of the Mr 56,000 protein purified after coprecipitating with T-ag and p53 identified it as the beta subunit of mouse tubulin. The existence of a complex containing tubulin, T-ag, and p53 was confirmed by reciprocal immunoblotting experiments. Both T-ag and p53 were coprecipitated by three different monoclonal antibodies directed against tubulin, and conversely, monoclonal antibodies specific for T-ag or p53 coprecipitated tubulin. Mixing experiments and extractions in the presence of purified tubulin indicated that the complex existed in situ prior to cell lysis. Both p53 and T-ag copurified with microtubules through two cycles of temperature-dependent disassembly and assembly. Both T-ag and p53 were localized to microtubules in the cytoplasm of mKSA cells by immunoelectron microscopy. Treatment of mKSA cells with 10 microM colchicine followed by lysis in 0.1% Nonidet P-40 resulted in increased amounts of solubilized T-ag and p53. Both T-ag and p53 were also associated with microtubules in three other simian virus 40-transformed mouse cell lines growing as monolayers, confirming the generality of the association. An interaction of T-ag and p53 with microtubules may be important in the intracellular transport of these proteins and may affect cellular signal transduction or growth control.


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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1991 by the American Association of Cancer Research.