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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 2, Issue 12 653-600, Copyright © 1991 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

The latent membrane protein oncoprotein resembles growth factor receptors in the properties of its turnover

J Martin and B Sugden
McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706.

The latent membrane protein (LMP) of Epstein-Barr virus functions as an oncogene in rodent cell lines (D. Wang, D. Liebowitz, and E. Kieff, Cell, 43: 831-840, 1985; V. R. Baichwal and B. Sugden, Oncogene, 2: 461-467, 1988) and, therefore, is likely to be essential for immortalization of human B-lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus. LMP has a short half-life in Epstein-Barr virus-infected B-lymphoblastoid cells (V. R. Baichwal and B. Sugden, J. Virol., 61: 866-875, 1987; K. P. Mann and D. Thorley-Lawson, J. Virol., 61: 2100-2108, 1987) and in LMP-transformed rodent cell lines (V. R. Baichwal and B. Sugden, Oncogene 2: 461-467, 1988). The hypothesis that the turnover of LMP functions to down-regulate LMP activity has been tested by determining whether the turnover of LMP resembles that of several receptors for growth factors and neurotransmitters. The rapid turnover of LMP in transformed BALB/c 3T3 cells is blocked by cycloheximide, which indicates that turnover requires ongoing protein synthesis. Greater than 90% of newly synthesized LMP is present at the cell surface within 20 min of synthesis, and the detectable protein remains at this location for up to 6 h. If cells are grown in the presence of cycloheximide such that turnover of LMP is inhibited, an internalized pool of LMP can be detected; this observation indicates that turnover of LMP is likely to be preceded by internalization and that, once internalized, LMP is rapidly degraded. Also, this result indicates that the degradation of LMP, as opposed to its internalization, requires ongoing protein synthesis. The turnover of LMP and its biological activity (as assayed by cytotoxicity) are not regulated by factor(s) present only in serum, because the half-life of LMP in cells maintained in serum-free medium does not differ from that in the same cells grown in 5% calf serum. The rapid turnover, the requirement of protein synthesis for turnover, and the internalization of LMP are consistent with the functioning of this protein as a (ligand-dependent or independent) cell surface receptor.


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Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
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Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1991 by the American Association of Cancer Research.