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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 2, Issue 11 583-591, Copyright © 1991 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Release of H2O2 and phosphorylation of 30 kilodalton proteins as early responses of cell cycle-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis by transforming growth factor beta 1

M Shibanuma, T Kuroki and K Nose
Department of Cancer Cell Research, University of Tokyo, Japan.

Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and H2O2 both inhibited DNA synthesis of mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3) cells in the late G1 phase of the cell cycle. TGF-beta 1 stimulated cells to release H2O2 in the late G1 phase, but not in the G0 phase, even though TGF-beta 1 receptors were present in both phases. The inhibition of DNA synthesis caused by TGF-beta 1 was partly decreased by the addition of catalase. TGF-beta 1 and H2O2 increased the phosphorylation of the same proteins with a molecular weight of 30,000 in cells in the late G1 phase, and the increase by TGF-beta 1 was abolished at least partly by catalase. The results suggest that H2O2 is one of the mediators of inhibition of DNA synthesis by TGF-beta 1.


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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1991 by the American Association of Cancer Research.