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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 2, Issue 1 15-22, Copyright © 1991 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Cloning and expression of the human substance K receptor and analysis of its role in mitogenesis [published erratum appears in Cell Growth Differ 1991 May;2(5):266]

RM Kris, V South, A Saltzman, S Felder, GA Ricca, M Jaye, K Huebner, J Kagan, CM Croce and J Schlessinger
Department of Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York 10016.

The primary structure of the human substance K receptor was established from the sequences of complementary DNA clones isolated from a human jejunal complementary DNA library. It consists of 398 amino acids, including seven putative transmembrane regions. The gene for the human substance K receptor was localized to chromosome region 10p13-10q23, a region with frequent chromosomal abnormalities. The human substance K receptor was expressed in transfected NIH-3T3 cells lacking endogenous substance K receptors, and Scatchard analysis of 125I-labeled substance K binding indicates approximately 100,000 receptors/cell with a single dissociation constant of 12 nM. Covalent cross-linking experiments utilizing 125I-substance K and three different chemical cross-linking reagents (disuccinimidyl suberate, disuccinimidyl tartrate, or 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide-HCl) demonstrate an apparent molecular weight of 45,000, consistent with little or no N-linked glycosylation. The binding of substance K to its receptor on transfected cells led to a rapid increase in the production of total inositol phosphates and the release of Ca2+ from internal stores. Growth of the cells transfected with the human substance K receptor is stimulated by the addition of substance K to the medium to a level similar to 10% serum. Therefore, the human substance K receptor can function as a growth factor receptor when expressed in mouse 3T3 cells.


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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1991 by the American Association of Cancer Research.