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Cell Growth & Differentiation Vol. 13, 141-148, March 2002
© 2002 American Association for Cancer Research

Role of the Src Homology 2 Domain-containing Protein Shb in Murine Brain Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Differentiation1

Lingge Lu, Kristina Holmqvist, Michael Cross and Michael Welsh2

Departments of Medical Cell Biology [L. L., K. H., M. W.], and of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory [M. C.], Uppsala University, 751 23, Uppsala, Sweden

To study the role of the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein Shb in angiogenesis, wild-type Shb and SH2 domain-mutated Shb (R522K Shb) were overexpressed in murine immortalized brain endothelial cells. The wild-type Shb cells exhibited an increased rate of apoptosis on serum withdrawal. Both wild-type Shb and R522K Shb cells exhibited enhanced spreading concomitant with cytoskeletal rearrangements that occurred independently of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 stimulation. However, these effects may partly be caused by altered regulation of Rac1 and Rap1 activation in the Shb cells. The Shb-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements were not dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase activity, but could be reversed by inhibition of Src family kinases. FGF-2 failed to further enhance migration of wild-type Shb and R522K Shb cells. The R522K Shb cells cultured in collagen gels exhibit diminished tubular morphogenesis when treated with FGF-2, implicating the need for a functional Shb molecule in this process. These data suggest that Shb plays a role in the proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells and, hence, participates in angiogenesis.




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Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 2002 by the American Association of Cancer Research.