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Cell Growth & Differentiation Vol. 12, 211-221, April 2001
© 2001 American Association for Cancer Research

ß-Chemokine Induction of Activation Protein-1 and Cyclic AMP Responsive Element Activation in Human Myeloid Cells1

Yang-Ming Yang, William C. Hatch, Zhong-Ying Liu, Bin Du2 and Jerome E. Groopman2,, 3

Divisions of Experimental Medicine, [Y-M. Y., W. C. H., Z-Y. L., J. E. G.] and Infectious Diseases [B. D.], Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Chemokines effect leukocyte chemotaxis and activation through their binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors. Although early steps in chemokine signal transduction pathways have been characterized, there is relatively limited information available at the transcription factor level. To that end, we have examined the binding activity on activation protein-1 (AP-1) and cyclic AMP responsive element (CRE) target sequences in human THP-1 myeloid cells after treatment with the ß-chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1{alpha}). MIP-1{alpha} induced both AP-1 and CRE activation. Although inhibition of protein kinase C blocked the AP-1 activity induced by this chemokine, there was no decrease in CRE activation in the presence of a protein kinase A inhibitor. Using kinase assays, it appeared that mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were involved in CRE activation. In addition, HIV-1 infection of THP-1 cells resulted in constitutive activation of AP-1 and CRE elements but no further response to MIP-1{alpha} treatment. These results suggest that ß-chemokines act via protein kinase C-dependent pathways and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways to modulate the host transcriptional response in myeloid cells, and that this response is altered by HIV infection.




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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
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Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 2001 by the American Association of Cancer Research.