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Cell Growth & Differentiation Vol. 12, 157-167, March 2001
© 2001 American Association for Cancer Research

Signaling Mediated by the Closely Related Mammalian Rho Family GTPases TC10 and Cdc42 Suggests Distinct Functional Pathways1

Gretchen A. Murphy, Stephanie A. Jillian, David Michaelson, Mark R. Philips, Peter D’Eustachio and Mark G. Rush2

Departments of Biochemistry [G. A. M., S. A. J., P. D., M. G. R.], Cell Biology [D. M., M. R. P.], and Medicine [M. R. P.] and the Kaplan Cancer Center [P. D.], New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016

The mammalian Rho family GTPases TC10 and Cdc42 share many properties. Activated forms of both proteins stimulate transcription mediated by nuclear factor {kappa}B, serum response factor, and the cyclin D1 promoter; activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase; cooperate with activated Raf to transform NIH-3T3 cells; and, by a mechanism independent of all of these effects, induce filopodia formation. In contrast, previously reported differences between TC10 and Cdc42 are not striking. We now present studies of TC10 and Cdc42 in cell culture that reveal clear functional differences: (a) wild-type TC10 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane and less extensively to a perinuclear membranous compartment, whereas wild-type Cdc42 localizes predominantly to this compartment and less extensively to the plasma membrane; (b) expression of Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor {alpha} results in a redistribution of wild-type Cdc42 to the cytosol but has no effect on the plasma membrane localization of wild-type TC10; (c) TC10 fails to rescue a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cdc42 mutation, unlike mammalian Cdc42; (d) dominant negative Cdc42, but not dominant negative TC10, inhibits neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells stimulated by nerve growth factor; and (e) activation of nuclear factor {kappa}B-dependent transcription by Cdc42, but not by TC10, is inhibited by sodium salicylate. These findings point to distinct pathways in which TC10 and Cdc42 may act and distinct modes of regulation of these proteins.




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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 2001 by the American Association of Cancer Research.