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Cell Growth & Differentiation Vol. 12, 591-601, December 2001
© 2001 American Association for Cancer Research

Cell Cycle Regulation during Mouse Olfactory Neurogenesis

Marie-Emmanuelle Legrier, Angélique Ducray, Alain Propper, Moses Chao and Anne Kastner1

Laboratoire de neurosciences, EA481, Université de Franche-Comté, 25 030 Besançon Cedex, France [A. D., A. P., A. K.]; Cytogénétique moléculaire et oncologie, UMR 147, Institut Curie, Paris 75000, France [M-E. L.]; and Molecular Neurobiology Program, Skirball Institute for Biomolecular Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 [M. C.]

The development of the nervous system requires a strict control of cell cycle entry and withdrawal. The olfactory epithelium (OE) is noticeable by its ability to yield new neurons not only during development but also continuously during adulthood. The aim of our study was to investigate, by biochemical and immunohistochemical methods, which cell cycle regulators are involved in the control of neuron production during OE development and maturity. At birth, olfactory neural progenitors, the basal cells, exhibited a high mitogenic and neurogenic activity, decreasing in the following weeks together with the drop in expression of several cell cycle regulators. p27Kip1 and p18Ink4c, at birth, were expressed in the whole basal cell layer, whereas p16Ink4a, p19Ink4d, and p21Cip1 were rather located in differentiating or mature neurons. CDK inhibitors may thus act sequentially during this developmental neurogenic process. By comparison, in the adult OE, in which most neural precursors were quiescent, these cells still exhibited p18Ink4c expression but only occasionally p27Kip1 expression. It suggests that p18Ink4c may contribute to maintain basal cells in a quiescent state, whereas p27Kip1 expression in these cells may be rather linked to their neurogenic activity, which declines with age. In keeping with this hypothesis, transgenic mice that lacked p27Kip1 expression displayed a higher rate of cell proliferation versus differentiation in their OE. In these mice, a down-regulation of positive cell cycle regulators was observed that may contribute to compensate for the absence of p27Kip1. Taken together, the present data suggest distinct functions for CDK inhibitors, either in the control of cell cycle exit and differentiation during neurogenesis (respectively, p27Kip1 and p19Ink4d) or in the maintenance of a quiescent state in neural progenitors (p18Ink4c) or neurons (p21Cip1) in adults.




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Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
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Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 2001 by the American Association of Cancer Research.