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Cell Growth & Differentiation Vol. 11, 211-219, April 2000
© 2000 American Association for Cancer Research


Articles

Binding of 14-3-3ß to the Carboxyl Terminus of Wee1 Increases Wee1 Stability, Kinase Activity, and G2-M Cell Population

Yuli Wang, Chris Jacobs, Kenneth E. Hook, Hangjun Duan, Robert N. Booher and Yi Sun1

Departments of Molecular Biology [Y. W., C. J., H. D., Y. S.] and Cancer Research [K. E. H.], Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research, Division of Warner-Lambert Company, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105, and Onyx Pharmaceutical, Inc., Richmond, California 94806 [R. N. B.]

Abstract

Wee1 protein kinase plays an important regulatory role in cell cycle progression. It inhibits Cdc-2 activity by phosphorylating Tyr15 and arrests cells at G2-M phase. In an attempt to understand Wee1 regulation during cell cycle, yeast two-hybrid screening was used to identify Wee1-binding protein(s). Five of the eight positive clones identified encode 14-3-3ß. In vivo binding assay in 293 cells showed that both full-length and NH2-terminal truncated Wee1 bind with 14-3-3ß. The 14-3-3ß binding site was mapped to a COOH-terminal consensus motif, RSVSLT (codons 639 to 646). Binding with 14-3-3ß increases the protein level of full-length Wee1 but not of the truncated Wee1. Accompanying the protein level increases, the kinase activity of Wee1 also increases when coexpressed with 14-3-3ß. Increased Wee1 protein level/enzymatic activity is accountable, at least in part, to an increased Wee1 protein half-life when coexpressed with 14-3-3ß. The protein half-life of the NH2-terminal truncated Wee1 is much longer than that of the full-length protein and is not affected by 14-3-3ß cotransfection. Biologically, 14-3-3ß/Wee1 coexpression increases the cell population at G2-M phase. Thus, Wee1 binding with 14-3-3ß increases its biochemical activity as well as its biological function. The finding reveals a novel mechanism by which 14-3-3 regulates G2-M arrest and suggests that the NH2-terminal domain of Wee1 contains a negative regulatory sequence that determines Wee1 stability.




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HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 2000 by the American Association of Cancer Research.