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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 1, Issue 9 401-406, Copyright © 1990 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Preferential retention of paternal alleles in human retinoblastoma: evidence for genomic imprinting

RJ Leach, AN Magewu, JD Buckley, WF Benedict, C Rother, AL Murphree, S Griegel, MF Rajewsky and PA Jones
Kenneth Norris Jr. Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles 90033.

The origins of the initial mutations in sporadic retinoblastoma were explored using polymorphic markers from chromosome 13q. The paternal chromosome was maintained in 3 of 3 informative bilateral tumors which had undergone reduction to homozygosity for regions of this chromosome. The paternal chromosome was maintained in 7 of 8 informative unilateral tumors which likewise demonstrated a reduction of homozygosity. These data are in contrast to previously published studies of chromosome retention in unilateral retinoblastoma [Dryja, T. P., Mukai, S., Petersen, R., Rapaport, J. M., Walton, D., and Yandel, D. W. Nature (Lond.), 339: 556-558, 1989; Zhu, Z., Dunn, J. M., Phillips, R. A., Goddard, A. D., Paton, K. E., Becker, A., and Gallie, B. L. Nature (Lond.), 340: 312-313, 1989] and provide the first evidence that genomic imprinting may play a role in this disease.





HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1990 by the American Association of Cancer Research.