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Cell Growth & Differentiation, Vol 1, Issue 1 39-45, Copyright © 1990 by American Association of Cancer Research


ARTICLES

Assembly of transcriptionally active chromatin in vitro: a possible role for topoisomerase II

RQ To and EB Kmiec
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, Davis 95616.

Some models of in vitro chromatin assembly suggest a biphasic molecular mechanism. The first phase, nucleosome formation, is comprised of the formation of histone-DNA complexes which mature into a canonical nucleosome structure. The second phase represents the process by which these nucleosomes become properly spaced with a regular periodicity on the DNA. In this report, we examine the role of DNA topoisomerases in the latter phase of chromatin assembly. To study this process, we use a Xenopus laevis cell-free extract, which assembles quantitative amounts of chromatin on circular DNA templates, and the type II topoisomerase-specific antitumor drugs VM-26 and endrofloxicin. Our results suggest that nucleosome formation is unaffected by the presence of VM-26 or endrofloxicin. However, periodic spacing of nucleosomes is inhibited significantly by these drugs. In the absence of proper chromatin assembly, circular DNA molecules are processed into nucleoprotein complexes which are transcribed poorly. Taken together, these results indicate that the antitumor drugs VM-26 and endrofloxicin influence gene expression indirectly by blocking the periodic spacing of nucleosomes.





HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cancer Research Clinical Cancer Research
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Molecular Cancer Research Cell Growth & Differentiation
Copyright © 1990 by the American Association of Cancer Research.